Contributor: Rafaela Pandolfini

Rafaela Pandolfini is a Sydney-based artist interested in the expression of emotion as form. She is constantly looking to explore movement through the lens.

rafaelapandolfini.com

MATT AND JUSTIN: ANCESTRAL MAGIC

Artists Justin Shoulder and Matt Stegh live, work and breathe for their community. Across performance, costuming, queer parties and nightlife, the two combine the personal and the political – a fusion expressed beautifully within their home. On a still, sunny winter morning in Sydney’s Summer Hill, I had the pleasure of visiting Justin and Matt at home, where they’ve lived since 2011.

Jim, Hana & Nonna’s Vertical Playground

Nightlife-loving Sydneysiders may already know of Jim Singline and Hana Shimada through Goodgod Small Club, the basement venue the couple founded in the mid-2000s and eventually sold in 2015. Rafaela Pandolfini shares an Aperol Spritz with Jim and Hana at their Redfern terrace to hear about their work, their home and how the two are intrinsically connected.

Iggy’s Bread of the World

With its beginnings in Boston, Massachusetts, Iggy's Bread in Bronte came about as a happy accident during a visit to Sydney by owners Igor and Ludmilla Ivanovic. Fast-forward to 2016, and Iggy's Bread in Bronte is something of an institution in the area, with its community-focused philosophies driving the business. Regular AP contributor Rafaela Pandolfini takes a behind-the-scenes look at her favourite neighbourhood haunt.

Jesse, Katie, Jarrah & Willow: Banksia block party

According to the 2011 census, in Banksia ­– named after the Australian wildflower ­– 50% of residents were born outside Australia, making it a true ‘melting pot’ of Macedonian, Chinese, Lebanese and migrant Australian cultures. Rafaela Pandolfini drops by the renovated Federation-era home of Jesse and Katie Maling and their two sons to learn about the family’s story of Banksia-infused life and love.

A Place to Break in the Movement of the Crowd

Talking civic spaces and 'the space between' we asked Rafaela Pandolfini to turn her lens to people using public areas. Leaning, lounging, perching, conversing – the moments captured are a tale of two cities and the collective personalities of their inhabitants. Where in the past Rafaela has observed the movement of the crowd, now she discovers where we find a place to break in it.

A Stitch in Time

The Frock Exchange in Sydney and Archive in Melbourne are in the business of extending mindfulness from our lives to our wardrobes – in a fabulous way! By slowing down the fast-paced, high-turnover fashion retail experience they encourage us to think independently, and with consideration, when it comes to the clothes we buy and the way in which we treat them.

Wanderlust waratah: Jenny Kee

Jenny Kee is a fashion pioneer. Never one to follow, Jenny spent the heady, flower-power era pursuing life, love and art in London in the 60s. Since returning home to Australia in the 1970s, Jenny has cemented her name as a cultural icon through her vibrant fashion and art that celebrates Australian landscape and culture. Surrounded by waratah and wattle, Rafaela Pandolfini visits Jenny at her Blackheath home.

Movement of the crowd

Photographer Rafaela Pandolfini naturally looks to the movement of the crowd in places where people are preoccupied with carrying out contemporary rituals. Art openings, parties, clubs, the beach and the park. Her interest is in the way people move together or alone, their shapes and patterns against vast or modest backgrounds. Their objects, their dress, and what they use and discard.

Blood & Thunder

Kernow Craig, director at Blood & Thunder, has a contagious passion for design and printing. His “publishing concern” (aka studio) is a place with one foot in the printing presses of yore and the other in the binary soup we call the internet. Rafaela Pandolfini visits Blood & Thunder’s new studio in Darlinghurst, Sydney for an insight into a unique, print and pixel design business.

Mitch and Kylie: collecting heirlooms

I challenge you to find a power cord in the Sydney home of wardrobe stylist Kylie Gonder and designer Mitch “Beige” Brown. Hiding pesky cables is no mean feat in this compact 1940s apartment “with character”. I visited one sunny Saturday to document, chat and sip a mean G&T in this warm and welcoming home set high up in the treetops of Edgecliff.