Contributor: Alexis Kalagas

Alexis Kalagas is an urban strategist and writer. Previously a foreign policy advisor, and editor of a Geneva-based media start-up, he spent four years at the interdisciplinary design practice Urban-Think Tank, working on housing and inclusive urban development projects in Europe, Latin America, and sub-Saharan Africa. In 2018, he was awarded a Richard Rogers Fellowship by the Harvard GSD.

alexiskalagas.com/

Redesigning Renting: Housing as a Service

Sharing economy increasingly means that we subscribe to a service (transport, music, even clothes and cars) instead of buying the thing. But how does this work with housing? Alexis Kalagas continues his research into start-ups that are redesigning renting.

A Bubble to Call Your Own: Home Futures

Every year. IKEA publishes a report on its research into how we live: our homes, after all, are a reflection of our lives. Just as our ideas of home are changing at an unprecedented pace - courtesy of WeLive, build-to-rent and co-living experiments - a lively exhibition at London's Design Museum looks at what the future of home looked like in the past decades. Alexis Kalagas muses on home utopias and dystopias.

The Great Disruption: Proptech & ‘Generation Rent’

Move over, Airbnb: here comes 'proptech'. The new generation of apps goes beyond the dubiously-named 'sharing economy' to affect real estate in far more complex ways, from virtual bond deposits to micro-investing. Alexis Kalagas reports from London, where proptech is booming - together with the property market.

Designing Club Culture: Don’t Fight It, Feel It

Born in the 1960s, discothéques were early incubators of experimentation in design, new media and ways of living. From fashion trends to regulations around noise, alcohol and propriety, what resonates above all is how nightlife shapes wider urban life. Alexis Kalagas charts a wonderful and colourful history of nightclubbing.

Co-op City: Zürich’s experiment with non-profit housing

Alexis Kalagas surveys the ebbs and flows of Zurich's co-operative housing movement. From the seminal Kraftwerk1 development in the early 2000s, via Mehr als Wohnen ('more than living') project, to Kalkbreite, completed just three years ago – what can we glean from Switzerland's extended experimentation with the co-operative model?