Waqt al-tagheer: Time of Change

Adelaide’s ACE Open will play host to a noteworthy moment in Australian contemporary art history when it opens the inaugural exhibition by new Muslim Australian art collective eleven, Waqt al-tagheer: Time of Change, as part of Adelaide Festival 2018.

Opening at 5pm Saturday 3 March, the national collective’s exhibition presents new and recent painting, installation, video, performance, sculpture and virtual reality artworks by artists Abdul Abdullah, Abdul-Rahman Abdullah, Hoda Afshar, Safdar Ahmed, Khadim Ali, Eugenia Flynn, Zeina Iaali, Khaled Sabsabi, Abdullah M.I. Syed and Shireen Taweel.

Shireen Taweel is also a Next Wave Festival 2018 artist and her work centred around research into mosques in regional Australia and other under-acknowledged sites of history and contemporary Muslim Australian identity will be shown later in the year at The Substation in Melbourne’s Newport. The resulting works contribute to a cross-cultural discourse of shared histories and experiences between diverse communities and cultural groups.

Main image: Abdullah M.I. Syed, Aura II 2013 (detail), hand-stitched white crocheted prayer caps (topi), Perspex and LED light, 127 (diameter) x 54cm. Courtesy the artist and ACE Open.

Where: ACE Open, Lion Arts Centre, North Terrace (West End), Kaurna Yarta, Adelaide

When: Saturday 3 March - Saturday 21 April

How much: Free

More info: ACE Open website

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