Volume Art Book Fair

The second iteration of the biennial VOLUME Art Book Fair will be taking over Sydney’s Artspace, presenting the work of over 70 local and international publishers, from New York to South Korea. Presented in partnership with Artspace, Printed Matter, Inc., New York and Perimeter Books, Melbourne, the Fair includes a free schedule of talks, workshops, book launches, readings and performances expanding and complementing the main exhibition programme. Ever wanted to make your own book? Register your interest in BOOK MACHINE  II – an interactive installation-workshop pairing public participants with emerging designers to create their own publications.

We’re thrilled to announce that Assemble Papers will be participating in the Fair for a second time! Drop by the 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art x Para Site stand and sweep up a copy of our latest print issue, Assemble Papers #8: Metropolis., hot-off-the-press!

Main image courtesy Volume Art Book Fair 2015.

Where: Artspace, The Gunnery, 43-51 Cowper Wharf Roadway, Woolloomooloo

When: Friday 13 – Sunday 15 October

How much: Free entry

More info: Volume Art Book Fair

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