Open House Melbourne

Open House Melbourne is running again – and this year, to mark the 10th anniversary of the programme, there are even more buildings throwing open their doors to the public. From morning to evening this Saturday and Sunday, more than 200 buildings and landscapes will be on display, from residential dwellings, via commercial projects, to civic spaces. Highlights include the soon-to-be-redeveloped Collingwood Arts Precinct, the Koorie Heritage Trust, experimental arts venue Testing Grounds, the Walter Burley Griffin-designed Newman College at the University of Melbourne and the Monash University Earth Sciences Garden, designed by Melbourne landscape architects Rush Wright. The workspaces of select local design and built environment offices will also be up for scrutiny, including our very own Assemble headquarters, designed by our sister company Fieldwork. For the rather intimidatingly expansive list of participating buildings and events, head over to the website.

Main image courtesy Open House Melbourne.

Where: Melbourne CBD and beyond

When: 28 & 29 July

How much: Free! ($5 booking fee for certain pre-booked tours)

More info: Open House Melbourne website


Recent Articles

  • Radical Families

    "When ‘family’ is unshackled from ‘nature’ and ‘biology’, and hitched instead to ‘choice’ or ‘artifice’ or even just to ‘love’, then the possibilities are endless.” Naomi Stead considers what is radical, what is family and questions how the limited stock of conventional family housing can serve, and impact, the potentially limitless arrangements of radical families
  • From URL to IRL

    Let's not get so caught up in the promises of 'smart cities' to forget that we live material lives. In the latest instalment in a series of articles from our West Coast partners 'Future West' (Australian Urbanism), Dr Sarah Barns, research fellow in the Institute for Culture and Society, considers putting digital to work in shaping great places
  • Share Yaraicho

    Crises are opportunities for rebuilding resilience. In the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake, the need to counter social isolation with close-knit communities gave the impetus to the first purpose-built share house in Japan. Emily Wong spoke to Satoko Shinohara of Spatial Design Studio about Share Yaraicho