Liquid Architecture: Polythinking

Imagine if we turned our thinking around and embraced the incoherence and contradiction within ourselves and our environment. How would that change us?

Polythinking is a major program for sonic explorers Liquid Architecture, happening between 27 April and 6 May. The program explores the potential of polyphony – many voices – in the context of social sound and social listening, at different venues. Experimental pedagogies, installations, performance art and improvised music will be used to shift consciousness and push participants beyond the collective comfort zone. The essence of Polythinking is to teach us how to hold “multiple truths at once, producing collaborative sound and listening – and applying that to thinking about how to move forward, together.”

As part of the program, the annual Polyphonic Social: The Unsingularity will run over the first weekend at Abbotsford Convent. AOYE, featuring Rainbow Chan and Corin, will place polyphony on the dancefloor at Copacabana. On 29 April, Peter Brötzmann and Heather Leigh will lead Clare Cooper, Betty Apple and Ducklingmonster on a sonic adventure at the Tote Hotel. The program will finish on 6 May with Precog, celebrating the magic and mythology of the club.

Liquid Architecture is an organization based in Melbourne for artists working with sound. As well as investigating sound, Liquid Architecture explores the ideas communicated about, and the meaning of, sound and listening.

[Main image: Betty Apple performs at Sublate. Photos by Etang Chen, triptych by Jaye Carcary]

Where: Multiple venues across Melbourne.

When: 27 April - 9 May

How much: See Liquid Architecture website for details

More info: Liquid Architecture

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