Invisible Cities

Have you ever felt so connected to a place that you can’t help but tell everyone about it? Artist and human ecologist Asha Bee Abraham has developed a new participatory art project Invisible Cities, which does just that. Invisible Cities is an iPhone app and Asha’s third in a series of collaborative works that asks the public to convey their personal relationships to the sounds, streets and buildings of their community. Geolocating contributors’ audio anecdotes with sites throughout the city, Invisible Cities gives new life to the fabric and built environment of Melbourne. Invisible Cities builds on previous projects Die Insel (2014) and The People’s Wangaratta (2015), part of Asha’s ongoing research on and engagement with the connection between people and place.

As Asha explains: “The story of the city is written not by the historians or the travel bureaus. It is written as its people interact with its places through the simplicity of everyday life. We give the city its personality by exchanging smiles, stealing kisses and slamming car horns; We construct its sounds and the sights with our busking and street art; We draw the lines on the map through our paths to work. Our stories build the city, brick by brick, paragraph by paragraph.”

Invisible Cities will hold a launch party this Wednesday 11 November, 6-8pm, at Shebeen. Download the free iPhone app via iTunes and contribute your story via the Invisible Cities website.

Original image: ‘Invisible Cities participant Lucy Best’ by Asha Bee Abraham. Courtesy of Invisible Cities. 

Where: Across Melbourne

When: 11 Nov – 31 Dec 2015

How much: Free!

More info:


Recent Articles

  • Radical Families

    "When ‘family’ is unshackled from ‘nature’ and ‘biology’, and hitched instead to ‘choice’ or ‘artifice’ or even just to ‘love’, then the possibilities are endless.” Naomi Stead considers what is radical, what is family and questions how the limited stock of conventional family housing can serve, and impact, the potentially limitless arrangements of radical families
  • From URL to IRL

    Let's not get so caught up in the promises of 'smart cities' to forget that we live material lives. In the latest instalment in a series of articles from our West Coast partners 'Future West' (Australian Urbanism), Dr Sarah Barns, research fellow in the Institute for Culture and Society, considers putting digital to work in shaping great places
  • Share Yaraicho

    Crises are opportunities for rebuilding resilience. In the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake, the need to counter social isolation with close-knit communities gave the impetus to the first purpose-built share house in Japan. Emily Wong spoke to Satoko Shinohara of Spatial Design Studio about Share Yaraicho