Defying Empire: 3rd National Indigenous Art Triennial

Now showing at the National Gallery of Australia, Defying Empire: 3rd National Indigenous Art Triennial presents an expansive array of works from thirty contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists. The exhibition commemorates the 50th anniversary of the pivotal 1967 Referendum when an overwhelming 91 percent of Australians voted to include Aboriginal people in the census. The selection of works making up the show engages with intersecting issues of identity, racism, displacement, country, nuclear testing, sovereignty and the stolen generations. Exhibiting artists include Brook Andrew, Vicky West, Fiona Foley and Megan Cope, known for her large-scale sculptural installations. Melbourne-based artist Reko Rennie has installed an interactive installation for children and adults alike in the museum foyer. The NGA will also be running a rolling programme of talks, lectures and workshops to complement the show – see the website for full details.

Main image: ‘At Face Value’ (2013) by Raymond Zada, courtesy NGA.

Where: National Gallery of Australia, Parkes Place, Parkes, Canberra

When: Until Sun 10 September

How much: Free!

More info: NGA website

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