David Adjaye: Form, Heft, Material

Moscow’s Garage Museum of Contemporary Art is currently hosting a major retrospective of the work of renowned British architect David Adjaye. Adjaye first became known for his residential dwellings in the early 2000s, prior to expanding his practice into the realm of the public with projects including the recent Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture completed in Washington DC last year. The exhibition presents a selection of more than twenty of Adjaye’s projects and is divided into four sections, each devoted to a particular aspect of his practice. Living spaces (domestic architecture), Democracy of Knowledge (civic and educational projects) and African Research make up three of these sections. The final section, Asiapolis, compiles the studio’s ambitious research into the state of post-Soviet urban landscapes, from population density to urban infrastructure.

Main image: Moscow School of Management (2010), photo by Ed Reeve courtesy ArchDaily.

Where: Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, 9/32 Krymsky Val St, Moscow

When: Until Sun 30 July

How much: Full 300 rubles / Concession 150 rubles

More info: Garage MOCA website


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