‘Chasing the Sky’ book launch

There’s a lot to be said for having role models you can relate to – this is true in any profession, but perhaps more so as a woman working in the field of architecture. The latest book in Maven Publishing‘s highly acclaimed ’20 Stories’ series, Chasing the Sky: 20 Stories of Women in Architecture showcases 20 of Australia’s leading women in the profession. Within its pages, we hear from Hannah Tribe, Emma Williamson, Debbie Ryan, Sue Carr, Kerstin Thompson and so many other leading female voices in Australian architecture, who share their thoughts on education; on craft and technology; on collaboration and inventive processes; on formative influences and entrepreneurship; and on the relationship between architecture and society.

’20 Stories’ is Maven Publishing’s series about the people behind the production of the built environment. Who is the person behind the creation? How are they inspired? And what was overcome to realise the vision? The ’20 stories’ series aims to showcase the lives of architectural designers and captures the most relevant aspects of contemporary thought and research. This new imprint focuses on bold, diverse and commercial voices who speak to readers on a personal level.

Following a successful launch in Sydney, Chasing the Sky is set to launch in Melbourne on Thursday 6 April at No Vacancy Gallery from 6pm.
If you’d like to head along, be sure to RSVP to dean [at] maven-publishing.com

Where: No Vacancy Gallery, 34–40 Jane Bell Lane, QV Building, Melbourne

When: Thursday 6 April, from 6pm

How much: Free

More info: Maven Publishing

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