When she isn’t writing songs and singing for Melbourne outfit The Harpoons, Bec Rigby DJs under the name Big Rig. Lately, she’s been busy co-organising the Coal Blimey! fundraiser for the resistance against the Adani Carmichael mine in Queensland. Here, she shares a hearfelt mix ahead of the event.

Heart Openers mix by Big Rig

You may know Big Rig (a.k.a Bec Rigby) better by the velvety vocals she lends to Melbourne outfit The Harpoons as the band’s lead singer. When she’s not busy singing her heart out, Bec DJs under the name Big Rig. Lately, she’s also been busy organising a fundraiser gig for those fighting against the Adani Carmichael mine in Queensland (read our write-up on the Coal Blimey! fundraiser here, and more about the Wangan & Jagalingou people’s important resistance against Adani here). It’s all happening on Saturday 18 March in Brunswick, Melbourne, and we asked DJ Big Rig to put a special EARS mix together for us to mark the occasion. Here, she shares a few words about the mix:

“For this mix I wanted to put together a lot of my favourite sounds that bring with them a deep sense of the places they come from. I was thinking about the W&J people in Queensland who are currently in court arguing against the Adani corporation’s attempts to build a big old mine on their land. I was thinking about land and country, and all the ways we’re tied to them and all the ways we’ve misunderstood that over time – it all comes back to the earth.”

EARS #27: Heart Openers mix by Big Rig – tracklisting
1. Grateful Dead – And We Bid You Goodnight
2 El Cangrejito – Tercato Yoyo
3. Steve & Teresa – Kaho’olawe Song
4. The Millenium Chorus – Distant Sun
5. Toumani Diabaté – Aminata Santoro
6. Sadza – Kusuva Musha
7. B Glenn Copeland – Sunset Village
8. The Millenium Chorus – My Island Home 
9. Abdullah Ibrahim – Toyi-Toyi Introduction / Kramat

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