AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_018_2000x1333

Other than Australia (which, as a continent, doesn’t really count), Greenland is the largest island in the world. Enveloped almost entirely by ice, however, Greenland is anything but ‘green’. In this special Eyes series, photographer Alisha Gore navigates the country’s largely uninhabited east coast, documenting a loaded, untamed landscape while meditating on the value of a life without distraction.

Across the Denmark Strait

I’ll admit to not knowing very much about Greenland before deciding to embark on an expedition cruise that would take me down its eastern coast, aside from the fact that greenery of any kind is very rarely seen at all.

AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_001_2000x1333

AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_002_2000x1301

AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_003_2000x1333

AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_004_2000x1333

It’s a country so far removed from the rest of the world that sometimes it feels as if you’re on another planet; a place where time stands still and silence is abundant. Zero access to a phone or wi-fi signal was a detox of the best kind and allowed me to really ‘see’ and appreciate the beauty around me with no distractions.

PNG8_AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_005_

AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_006_2000x1459

AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_007_2000x1333

AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_008_2000x1333

Despite the freezing climate in the remote town of Ittoqqortoormiit on Greenland’s east coast, I discovered an environment teeming with vibrancy – something I didn’t initially expect to find.

AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_009_2000x1394

AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_011_2000x1333

AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_010_2000x1344

AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_012_2000x1301

I started to notice the colours and textures of my immediate environment being reflected in the buildings dotted around the tiny fishing town: the reds and oranges of the ground cover and moss, the cool hues in the small shards of rock, and the greens and blues of the ocean – all utilised to distinguish the purpose of each building.

AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_014_2000x1333

AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_013_2000x1333

AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_015_2000x1333

AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_016_2000x1459

What started off as documentation of the landscapes spanning from Svalbard (an island to Norway’s north) to Greenland and Iceland ended up becoming an exercise in appreciating the little details that make life beautiful.

AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_017_2000x1333

AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_018_2000x1333

AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_019_2000x1333

AP_Eyes_Alisha-Gore_020_2000x1090

Thanks to Alisha Gore for letting us in on her trip to Greenland through her evocative photography and accompanying thoughts and musings. Find more of Alisha’s work over at her website: www.alishagore.com

BACK

Recent Articles

  • Amee & Karl’s Brutalist Maisonette

    9-8-16-0002 Inside the 16-storey Keeling House in London's Bethnal Green, PR specialist Amee Patel and illustrator Karl Maier (one half of transatlantic duo Craig & Karl) welcome us into their Brutalist maisonette inspired by the Japanese concept of 'zakka'. Rachel Elliot-Jones and photographer Morgan Brown drop in on the couple to chat about their work, their daily routines and their Brutally beautiful London abode
  • Come Together

    cometogether If urban planners, developers and local citizens engage on driving density in Perth, they might just find there's a lot of common ground, says urbanist Nic Temov in this article from Issue Two of 'Future West (Australian Urbanism)' – a new print publication considering the future of urbanism through the lens of Perth and Western Australia
  • City Edge: Melbourne’s Original Urban…

    ap_cityedge_2131_web South Melbourne's City Edge, built in the early '70s, is inner-city medium-density housing at its finest, with its 'urban village' design by Daryl Jackson and Evan Walker rendering it a landmark development of its time. Rachel Elliot-Jones and photographer Tom Ross head to City Edge to chat with residents about City Edge's significance and value to Melbourne's built heritage