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Golden Girls write songs about love, sex and literature, blending hard beats and soft vocals with deep subs and melodic bass. On Sat 10 Dec they’ll be appearing at Blow-Up in Brunswick: a one-night festival inside a blown-up inflatable structure conceived in association with RMIT Architecture’s Pneumatic Structures Unit. Jake from Golden Girls shared this mix ahead of the party.

Emotional ‘90s Trance mix by Golden Girls

Golden Girls write songs about love, sex and literature, blending hard beats and soft vocals with deep subs and melodic bass. The Melbourne three-piece – consisting of Jocelyn (vocals/synth), Jake (bass) and Tim (guitar/beats) – released their debut EP Golden Hour in late 2015 and have new music set for lift-off in 2017.

On Saturday 10 December they’ll be making an appearance at Blow-Up festival in Brunswick: a one-night festival inside a blown-up inflatable structure conceived in association with the Pneumatic Structures Unit at RMIT Architecture. Joining them at the festival are EARS alumni Pikelet (EARS #4: Spring Leaves and Sunshine mix) and Simon Winkler (EARS #1, Springtime Surf Mix; EARS #21, Hard to be a Diamond mix), plus Hero, AltaVista, Ricci, Merve and plenty more. Projections inside the blow-up structure come courtesy of Iolanthe Iezzi, Alexi Freeman and Byron Myer.

Ahead of the event, Jake from Golden Girls has shared this EARS mix that looks back through rose-coloured goggles at the days of ‘90s trance. Jake explains: “A little while ago, Tim and I were asked to DJ a party and were asked to play something ‘feminine’ – trip hop – perhaps the kind of music they thought inspired Golden Girls. That struck me as not particularly interesting for a party. I wanted to play the kind of music I like to hear at parties – techno and Eurodance that I listened to in my teens.” Digging through his collection of tunes, Jake found himself drowning in progressive trance from the ‘90s (“unfortunately trance became truly terrible after 1996,” he adds), and was struck by its simplicity. “I really like how such simple music, with so few elements, can evoke such happiness – for me anyway. The Italians really seemed to do this best.”

The result? “This little mix is a bunch of emotional early ‘90s italo-trance, except for the last track by Melbourne group Mystic Force,” says Jake.

Best enjoyed with an ice-cold gelato.

Golden Girls: Facebook / Bandcamp
Blow-Up: facebook.com/events/1764967727103649 – tickets $15 + BF

EARS #25: Emotional ‘90s Trance mix by Golden Girls – tracklisting

1. 2 Culture in a Room – Android
2. Basic Connection – Faithless
3. Disco Bianco – Le Voyage
4. Lello B – Clear World Phase One
5. Mauro Tannino & Stefano di Carlo – Land of Oz
6. Poseidon – The Nightfly (Moon Version)
7. Mystic Force – Psychic Harmony

 

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